HTTPs secures Half of all Web Traffic

HTTPs secures Half of all Web Traffic

Encrypted web traffic means a secured connected. Privacy issues have been a long term concern and over the years, we’ve seen a rapid growth of security problems. But now, half of all web traffic is encrypted as per Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).

This report was released based on the statistics that came from Google and Firefox web browsers stating that one half of all internet traffic from their respective browsers is encrypted. The data is collected by examining the usage of the standard HTTPS encryption protocol based on data from users that choose to share the information. Implementing this secure web protocol enables to protect users from malicious activities.

The success of turning 50% of websites secure owes to a number of efforts, which also counts in moves made by market giants to deploy HTTPS on their websites. In the long run, these initiative to make HTTPS security protocol more recognizable, several leading tech companies made its contribution by implementing the security standard on their own properties that includes big websites like Facebook, Twitter, Google, Reddit, Wikipedia and more.

Amidst all this, Google played a bigger role to increase the adoption of this security by including HTTPS as one of its parameters for searching engine ranking. Moreover, it also made another effective move by marking websites with HTTP connections that deals with online transaction as insecure. This means that you can see a warning from Google on the web address as ‘Not Secure’, when you land on a particular website.

Although the adoption rate of encryption is growing rapidly, there are yet many major flaws here. As per Google, 97% of unprotected traffic comes from mobile devices. There’s much security service providers can do, unless web developers themselves take the responsibility to secure their properties.

Apart from HTTPS, organizations can consider using additional security solutions from data center service provider for an extra layer of data security.